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free crochet pattern: colorful necklace

 

colourful-circles-crochet-necklace-pdf-pattern-by-jakigu

A long time ago I made a lot of tiny crochet circles, using embroidery floss leftovers. Not sure what to do with them, I tucked them away until I rediscovered them one cold day last fall. After playfully arranging them for a while, they lined up and asked to be put together into a colorful necklace. I instantly liked the necklace – a cheerful, rainbow-colored piece of textile jewelry that’s not too bold for a conservative minimalist like myself. But when my son was about 4 months old, he started noticing the necklace, too; reaching out for it as he nursed. And just like that, this simple piece of jewelry became the first nursing necklace I made. When a couple people asked for instructions on how to make their own, I wrote a crochet pattern and it quickly became a popular design in my Etsy shop. But as I woke up this morning and saw all the snow we got overnight, I felt like it was Christmas morning again. And I wanted to spread the joy. So I decided to take the pattern off the store shelf, so to speak, and offer the pattern for free instead.It’s a perfect quick little project for a snowy Saturday, when all you need to do is make some hot tea, put on your warm socks, and spend the afternoon making something adorable.

Colors of the necklace can be customized to your liking, so you can create a necklace as unique as you are. Circles of my necklace are arranged so that the necklace is reversible – with rainbow of pastel hues on one side, and primary colors on the other. The skills needed to complete the project are easy enough for a beginner crocheter (only slip stitches, chain stitches, US single and double crochet are used). And you probably already have enough thread at home to make it this afternoon – scraps are all you need.The wonderful thing about the necklace is that it could be so much more than just fashion accessory. It might work for you and your little one as a nursing necklace (whether you are breast feeding or bottle feeding – children are drawn to bright colors). It could easily be made longer for an adorable nursery room bunting; you could hang it on the car seat handle to give your infant something bright and colorful to look at while you’re driving; and crocheted in white or cream and gold (or green, red, and gold) it would make a lovely Christmas garland.

Click here to download a PDF file with complete instructions and a pattern to make the necklace.

And when you’re finished, I would love to see your creations! Feel free to post pictures of your necklace on Facebook, or leave a comment below, on Pinterest, or Twitter. Let me know what you think of the pattern, how you like the necklace – I am eager to hear everything!

NB: There are more patterns in my Etsy shop and you’re welcome to stop by anytime. These days, crocheters can’t get enough of this stacking baskets bundle in three matching designs – and just between you and me, these baskets are my favorite, too.

jute-and-cotton-basket-jakigu-crochet-pattern

 

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crochet nursing necklace

I really like the concept of nursing necklaces.
Crochet Bib Necklace by JaKiGu

Nursing necklaces, breastfeeding necklaces, mommy necklaces – call them whatever you like, I think they are pretty cool. After all, especially with a baby in her arms, every mom want to feel pretty. But she needs something that will survive the incessant pulling and tugging. That’s why textile necklaces are such a great option. And if the right colours and materials get combined, even the baby will be able to appreciate their visual appeal while letting her tiny fingers explore the different textures.

Crochet Bib Necklace by JaKiGu

This simple pattern can be executed in either monochromatic tones or in a range of colours from contrasting brights to coordinating pastels to soothing neutrals. Beads are an optional addition – their weight adds substance to the piece but they are not necessary.

Crochet Bib Necklace by JaKiGu

With a knot closure, the length of the necklace can be customized. This way, the necklace can be worn with many different shirts regardless of how deep their necklines are. And the mom doesn’t need to worry about the closure snapping!

Crochet Bib Necklace by JaKiGu

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crochet karma necklace

I’ve been crocheting in circles for weeks now. Literally. Circles are fun!

All that’s needed to make this  necklace with crochet beaded karma circle is some perle cotton, an appropriate hook, and seed beads. It’s that simple. But what I personally love about it even more is that in the end, this pendant looks more like a piece of sophisticated jewelry than a simple crochet motif that it really is.

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crochet turkish oya necklace

I am trying something new.

Turkish Crochet Necklace by JaKiGu

I came across this crochet technique when browsing the Internet for nursing necklaces – child-safe pieces of jewelry that make the mama feel pretty while offering adequate entertainment and visual stimulation to the child she’s nursing.

Turkish Crochet Necklace by JaKiGu

In its pure form, oya lace is in fact a form of needle lace, and is most often found adorning edges of scarfs – along with a lot of tiny beads. But I found plenty of crochet versions – and they inspired me. This is my interpretation of Turkish oya lace and how it could work as part of a nursing necklace.

Turkish Crochet Necklace by JaKiGu

Almost all of the nursing necklaces I found contained either a plastic, metal, or wooden ring that was crocheted over. The idea of plastic or metal doesn’t really appeal much to me, and even though an unfinished wooden ring would be fine, the hassle of having to purchase some first got me thinking about alternatives.

Turkish Crochet Necklace by JaKiGu

Why not use thread only? This way, the necklace is safe, soft and pliable, and easily washable.

Turkish Crochet Necklace by JaKiGu

The individual flowers are quite small, but weigh just enough to keep the chain nice and taut.

Turkish Crochet Necklace by JaKiGu

Made in neutral tones, it could be a nice accessory for a woman who doesn’t even think about children!

I really like the initial results – and I already have ideas on where to take it next. More Turkish crochet necklaces are sure to come.