how to crochet: waistcoat stitch

Ah, the waistcoat stitch. The crochet version of the knitted stockinette stitch. A.k.a. the knit stitch. Or the “v” stitch. Or, if we wanted to get more technical, the center crochet stitch, or the split single crochet.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However intimidating some of these names may be, though, don’t let them fool you into thinking waistcoat stitch is complicated.

I like to think of waistcoat stitch as humble single crochet’s flamboyant twin. If you know how to work a single crochet, you know how to crochet the waistcoat stitch. That is because the latter is finished exactly the same way as the former. The striking difference in their final looks depends solely on hook placement. Before we exactly pinpoint where to insert the hook – and where the hook should exit on the back side – let’s have a look at a typical waistcoat stitch up close.

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learn to crochet: adjustable magic loop

jakigu.com | learn to crochet | adjustable loop

Adjustable magic loop comes in handy whenever your work starts as a crocheted circle and you do not desire a visible hole in the middle. Examples of such work include coasters, placemats, hats, doilies, rugs, or basket bases. In fact, I use this technique to start all of of my baskets.

In essence, adjustable magic loop allows you to comfortably crochet any number of stitches into a sliding loop rather than into a chain stitch, which is the alternative of starting crochet circles. At the end of the round, you simply tighten the sliding loop to close the gap, creating a center with a barely there or completely invisible hole.

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