Posted on

how to crochet: waistcoat stitch

Ah, the waistcoat stitch. The crochet version of the knitted stockinette stitch. A.k.a. the knit stitch. Or the “v” stitch. Or, if we wanted to get more technical, the center crochet stitch, or the split single crochet.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However intimidating some of these names may be, though, don’t let them fool you into thinking waistcoat stitch is complicated.

I like to think of waistcoat stitch as humble single crochet’s flamboyant twin. If you know how to work a single crochet, you know how to crochet the waistcoat stitch. That is because the latter is finished exactly the same way as the former. The striking difference in their final looks depends solely on hook placement. Before we exactly pinpoint where to insert the hook – and where the hook should exit on the back side – let’s have a look at a typical waistcoat stitch up close.

Continue reading how to crochet: waistcoat stitch

Posted on

learn to crochet: adjustable magic loop

Adjustable magic loop comes in handy whenever your work starts as a crocheted circle and you do not desire a visible hole in the middle. Examples of such work include coasters, placemats, hats, doilies, rugs, or basket bases. In fact, I use this technique to start all of of my baskets.

In essence, adjustable magic loop allows you to comfortably crochet any number of stitches into a sliding loop rather than into a chain stitch, which is the alternative of starting crochet circles. At the end of the round, you simply tighten the sliding loop to close the gap, creating a center with a barely there or completely invisible hole.

Magic loop, magic circle, adjustable loop, magic ring, adjustable ring, drawstring ring – this fundamental crochet technique goes by many names. Not surprisingly, there are also quite a few ways to execute it and each crocheter has their favorite.

Below you will find my favorite way of creating the adjustable magic loop. I will demonstrate the technique on a basic crochet circle consisting of 6 single crochets.

Continue reading learn to crochet: adjustable magic loop

Posted on

crocheting with jute: tips and tricks

If you follow my blog, you know how much I love crocheting with jute. Jute and cotton are my two most favorite fibers to work with. And if Pinterest is any indication, I am not the only one who likes the look of a basket made in a combination of these materials.

Jute is a natural fiber, derived from the jute plant. To learn about the jute plant itself, and where and how it’s grown, have a look at this Encyclopaedia Britannica entry. For additional information about jute, its environmental impact  and its various practical applications, I recommend this short article from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN.

Among jute’s most commonly recognized forms, when processed, are burlap cloth and sacks, and packaging twine. And it is this twine that I love to use when crocheting my baskets. Why? Continue reading crocheting with jute: tips and tricks